Unity.

My favorite aspect of PLUR is unity. Everyone’s always speaking about peace and love, and respect reminds me of your first day of middle school when you’re asked to list what “respect” means to you. Unity is something often not talked about outside the rave scene and I truly believe it’s the aspect most followed by the current rave scene.

Unity.
Last time I went to a rave I was feeling really upset about a few different things. I went to the party that night to try to forget and be part of something, see my friends, make new ones. I didn’t want to have to talk to anyone about anything serious and I didn’t want attention on me. Although men hit on me and I did receive attention, I know it was attention that was shown to many other girls and if I tried hard enough, I could rid myself of them. As the music played, the bass was pumping through the speakers and through my body, and through the bodies of those around me, I felt part of something bigger. That’s what I love about raving. The unity. The feelings that you’re part of something else.
It’s not about you and your problems, it’s about the music, the friendship, the vibes. You are united in that you are a raver. You like to dance. You like EDM. You like to meet people. Maybe you like drugs. Maybe not. But you do not judge those around you that are rolling, you offer them a hug if they’re bugging out, or some water if they look dehydrated.
It’s about the friendships. Seeing someone you knew years ago, swapping kandi, and instantly becoming best friends, even if you never were before.
And at the end of the night, you help someone get home, whether it’s by helping them find their way to the train station, lending them a few bucks for the ride, or by driving them yourself, knowing someone would do the same for you.

Peace,
Emilie

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About Emilie

A new NYC raver just getting into the scene.
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7 Responses to Unity.

  1. Dominique says:

    I think unity is my favorite aspect of raving as well. Its not followed by all, but it is followed by most.

  2. MichaelM says:

    I’m glad that still goes on somewhere at least. Here in SoCal raves are too commercialized and only a small number of people are traditional “Ravers”. People here (including me) take kindness with a grain of salt, because people just aren’t like that anymore and it’s unsafe.

    • Emilie says:

      I’d really like to hit a rave in SoCal… if only I could get there. I can’t believe it’s so different! Are you able to find the underground parties? They tend to have more traditional “ravers” who abide by PLUR.

  3. Daniel says:

    Hey Emilie, stumbled across your blog via twitter and gotta say that I’ve enjoyed reading it! I’m in a similar position to you, same age, love going out with friends raving, love the whole culture of it, the feeling of being part of something bigger etc but I’m from across the pond and go out raving in London! I do think that a lot of people that haven’t been before may be a little naive as to what goes on at a rave. I mean 90% of people are there for the same reasons as most, to let go of worries and become part of the culture, but there is the odd few that are there for the wrong reasons. Maybe an article to highlight this? Just a suggestion though :). Thanks again for taking the time to create this blog!

    PLUR from London πŸ™‚

    • Emilie says:

      Hey Daniel! Thanks for the comment! I’d love to hear more about what the rave scene is like in London, since raves did start over on your side of the world! That’s a great idea for a post, and I’ll definitely be writing about that soon! =] Feel free to contact me and we can talk about the differences between New York and London [I made some friends online that told me about the differences in California and Maryland… fascinating stuff, and maybe it’ll lead to a future post!] Thanks for reading and please keep watching!
      Peace.

      • Daniel says:

        Yeah not a problem! I’d love to share the experiences I’ve had, but I’m sure it’s much the same here as it is over in the US πŸ™‚ . I’m following you on Twitter now, danielreilly1 so feel free to ask me anything about what its like over here!

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